63rd Wedding Anniversary

Any couple reaching their sixty-third wedding anniversary has truly seen major changes, not only in their relationship but in the world around them.

Possibly now blessed with children, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren, this mature couple deserves love, respect and pampering from family and close friends.

Almost certainly now in their 80s, it's likely that extreme activities won't be on the card (but don't rule it out!). That doesn't mean the anniversary experience needs to be bland, boring and beige.

The couple and welcome guests can fill the day (or even longer) with colour and surprise, with flowers, exquisite foods, and gift experiences tailored just for the couple themselves.

It's likely the couple will already have all the material goods they need, and then some, which is why experiences, plants and edibles are favoured gifts. That said, as always, make sure the gifts reflect the personality, likes, hobbies and pastimes of the husband and wife.

Traditional Gift: -

There is no traditional wedding gift associated with the 63rd wedding anniversary.

However, by the 63rd year you will almost certainly have your own traditions as a couple, so why not find a gift based on those?

Modern Gift: -

There is no modern wedding gift associated with the 63rd wedding anniversary — hardly surprising given the seemingly fleeting nature of many relationships these days.

Sixty-three years together for any couple is a major and rare achievement, despite people generally living longer.

Even in your advanced years, perhaps there's still something 'modern' you long to do as a couple — travel, sport, hobby — for which an introductory gift might be appropriate. You're never too old to start something new!

Associated Gemstone: -

There's no traditional gemstone associated with the sixty-third wedding anniversary, but your taste in jewelry should surely be apparent by now.

Associated Flower: Lilac

First seen as the flower for the 8th wedding anniversary, lilac is suggested as a flower for the 63rd.

Lilacs are ornamental plants native to the Balkan Peninsula but naturalised in much of Europe and North America.

The beautiful flowers often come as light purple but can also be white, violet, blue and magenta. They have a strong aroma. Natural blooming tends to peak in early spring, often around Easter time, and is shortlived - less than a month.

White symbolises purity and innocence; violet for spirituality; blue for happiness and tranquility; magenta for love and passion; and lilac itself for first love.

The Celtics regarded the lilac as magical for their intoxicating fragrance. In Victorian times, the giving of a lilac was meant to be a reminder of an old love.

In Russia, holding a sprig of lilac over a newborn baby was said to bring wisdom.

The lilac is the official flower of New Hampshire state and represents the hardy nature of its people.

Van Gogh and Monet have both painted lilacs.

Lilac is popularly used in aromatherapy and as an essential oil.

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